Namibia: Acute Food Insecurity Situation October - November 2021 and Projection for December 2021 - March 2022
Drought, price shocks and economic impacts from COVID-19 measures drive food insecurity in Namibia
VALIDITY PERIOD
01.10.2021 > 31.03.2022

Key
results


Recommendations
& next steps


Acute
Malnutrition


For the current period of analysis (October – November 2021), approximately 659,000 people (26% of the population) are estimated to be facing high levels of acute food insecurity (IPC Phase 3 or above) and are requiring urgent humanitarian assistance. Of this population, 557,000 people are classified in Crisis (IPC Phase 3), representing 22% of the population analysed, and 102,000 (4% of the population analysed) are in Emergency (IPC Phase 4). An additional 896,000 people (35 % of the population) are in Stressed (IPC Phase 2). Most of the regions in the current period are classified in Crisis (IPC Phase 3), except Hardap, Oshana and Otjozondjupa, which are classified in Stressed (IPC Phase 2). In the regions of Kavango East and Ohangwena, 40% of the population are experiencing high acute food insecurity (IPC Phase 3 or above) whereas in Kharas and Zambezi, 10% of the population are experiencing an Emergency (IPC Phase 4) situation. Kharas continues to experience unprecedented high unemployment levels with a high dependency on purchases of food stuffs. Flash floods were experienced destroying some infrastructure leaving a serious challenge in overall food security situation.

For the projected period of analysis (December 2021 – March 2022), the number of people facing high levels of acute food insecurity is expected to increase from 659,000 to 750,000. This is due to the impact of the drought experienced previously, from whose effects it will take time to fully overcome. Hence, 30% of the population analysed is expected to be in IPC Phase 3 (Crisis) or above, with 5% of the population potentially facing an Emergency (IPC Phase 4) food insecurity situation. Ongoing food assistance from the government being provided through a food bank programme is expected to remain in place up to March 2022. In this same projection period, the situation is expected to deteriorate in the regions of Kavango East, Ohangwena and Kharas, that will see their proportion of people in IPC Phase 3 (Crisis) or above increasing. Except for the region of Otjozondjupa (projected to be in IPC Phase 2), all regions are expected to be classified in Crisis (IPC Phase 3). The most affected regions are drought-prone areas, including Kunene, Erongo, Omusati and Omaheke.


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