Close World Map  

Acute food
insecurity


Chronic food
insecurity


Acute
malnutrition



All Analyses


COUNTRY / REGION
TYPE OF ANALYSIS
KEY RESULTS
VALIDITY PERIOD

Acute Food Insecurity Classification

In April 2018, 5.5 million people, 13% of the analyzed population, were estimated to be in Crisis and Emergency (IPC Phases 3 and 4) in Sudan and in need of urgent action. The estimate corresponds to an increase of 45% compared to the previous analysis occurred at the same period last year (2017).   In the projected period, from May to July 2018, people in Crisis (IPC Phase 3) and Emergency (IPC Phase 4) are expected to increase to up to 6 million which corresponds to 14% of the total population analyzed.   Darfur, where at least 2.1 million people are still displaced, accounts for about half of the population in Crisis and Emergency (IPC Phase 3 and 4). In North Darfur almost 1 million people are in IPC Phase 3 and 4. Two localities are in Emergency (IPC Phase 4), namely Tawi[...]

Apr 2018/ Jul 2018

Acute Food Insecurity Classification

In March 2018, seven concentrations in CAR were classified in Emergency (IPC Phase 4) and ten prefectures and two concentrations were classified in Crisis (IPC Phase 3). During the lean season, from April to August 2018, in the absence of food assistance, it is estimated that there will be five prefectures and eight concentrations in Emergency (IPC Phase 4) and eight prefectures and one concentration Crisis (IPC Phase 3). Only the Bangui area would maintain IPC Phase 2 (Stress). Even with current food assistance, the population in need of immediate assistance in March 2018 was around 1.6 million and during the lean period (April - August 2018) would be around 2 million, of which a third located in sub-prefectures with a high concentration of displaced persons. The most vulnerab[...]

Mar 2018/ Aug 2018

Acute Food Insecurity Classification

KEY RESULTS FOR MARCH-JUNE 2018 The current period of the analysis coincides in part with the end of the lean season and the beginning of the crop season. Overall, we note a decrease in the number of people requiring urgent action in the areas most affected by the long drought of 2016, intensified by the effects of El Niño. However, with most districts classified as IPC Phase 3 (Crisis) or IPC Phase 3! (Crisis - would probably be at least 1 higher phase without the effects of Humanitarian Aid),the food and nutritional situation in the analysis zones remains worrying. Indeed, around 1 million people, or 30% of the population in the areas analyzed, are still in IPC Phase 3 and 4 (Crisis and Emergency), and require urgent action to reduce their food and nutrition deficits and protect [...]

Mar 2018/ Sep 2018

Acute Food Insecurity Classification

Between March and mid-April, the harvest and post-harvest period, the Kinyinya commune of the Ruyigi province was classified in the Crisis (IPC Phase 3). The rest of the country was classified in either Stress (IPC Phase 2) or Minimum (IPC Phase 1). During the next lean season from mid-April to May 2018, the proportion of populations in Crisis phase could increase by 3% compared to the current phase. Thus, the number of people in Crisis (IPC Phase 3) would rise from 1,460,000 people (13% of the total population) between March and mid-April 2018 to 1,780,000 people (15%) from mid-April to May 2018. Very good agricultural performances were recorded for the 2018A season, which benefited from a favorable rainfall regime, especially in the Northern, Eastern and Imbo Plains Depressions,[...]

Mar 2018/ May 2018

Acute Food Insecurity Classification

The Tri-national Border Federation of Río Lempa (Mancomunitad Trinacional Fronteriza Río Lempa) is a Public Law entity, located in the Trifinio Region and composed of municipalities of three countries of El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras. This report contains the results of the analysis carried out in February 2018 in seven microregions of the Tri-national Border Federation of Río Lempa according to the approach of the IPC Acute Food Insecurity scale, which aims to classify the severity and define the phase of food insecurity of the territories and / or communities making use of information of various kinds in order to support evidence-based decisions. The IPC helps resolve concerns about which areas are facing food insecurity, who it affects, how many people, and how serious is t[...]

Feb 2018/ Mar 2018



More analyses

Chronic Food Insecurity Classification

The first IPC Chronic Food Insecurity analysis conducted in Honduras has allowed to estimate that 9 of the 10 departments of the Dry Corridor of the country are in Level 3 (Moderate Chronic Food Insecurity); and a department (Francisco Morazán) in Level 2 (Mild Chronic Food Insecurity). IPC Chronic Food Insecurity Analyses results are valid up to 5 years, in absence of unusual shocks. 23% of the analyzed households are in Levels 3 (17%) or 4 (6%). For these households, food consumption presents a deficit of dietary energy for at least 2 months a year and every day they do not consume a proper diet. These households are characterized by low purchasing power, which is aggravated by the constant increase of food prices, reflecting this condition in an access to an inadequate diet in term[...]

Apr 2018/ Apr 2023

Chronic Food Insecurity Classification

In the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), two cleavages are visible: (i) the Eastern block, which is is strongly affected by armed conflicts of foreign troops and local militia, and (ii) the western and central blocks, more stable but very landlocked, developing rates of chronic malnutrition above the acceptable threshold. The national analysis of the Integrated Framework for the Classification of Chronic Food Security shows three major zones: (i) the city province of Kinshasa at Level 2 (light food insecurity), (ii) the center of the country and the Northeast at Level 4 (severe chronic food insecurity), and (iii) the remaining areas without Kinshasa at Level 3 (food insecurity).  According to national surveys conducted over the last ten years, three out of five households have acce[...]

Mar 2016/ Mar 2021

Chronic Food Insecurity Classification

The Chronic Food Insecurity of Nepal is analyzed for 13 sub regions in December, 2014. As Nepal has 15 sub-regions, unavailability of sufficient data for all 15 sub-regions and similarity in socio-economic and geographical conditions of three sub-regions made possible to combine three sub regions (West, Mid-West and Far-west Mountain) into one sub-region i.e. Western Mountain resulting 13 sub-regions for Analysis. It should be noted that two districts in Western mountain i.e. Manang and Mustang are found to be better off due to income from tourism. The Analysis conducted with Integrated Food Security Phase Classification (IPC) protocols and process.The analysis of the food insecurity situation of Nepal for period 2005 to 2014 shows that different sub-region varies its level of food ins[...]

Dec 2015/ Dec 2020

Chronic Food Insecurity Classification

This report presents the main conclusions of the 2nd round of the IPC Chronic Food Insecurity analysis, which covered 10 districts. The 1st round of IPC Chronic Food Insecurity analysis was conducted in November 2014 and covered 18 districts located in the Northern and Southern parts of Bangladesh. The results of both rounds of IPC Chronic Food Insecurity analysis covering a total of 28 districts will remain valid for next 3 to 5 years, in the absence of any structural changes. Out of the 10 districts analyzed, Sunamgonj and Bandarban have been classified in Level 4 or Severe Chronic Food Insecurity (CFI). The other 8 districts have been classified in moderate CFI (Level 3). Of the total population in the 10 districts analyzed, 12 percent is in Level 4 and 18 percent in Level 3. The p[...]

Dec 2015/ Dec 2020

Chronic Food Insecurity Classification

According to the IPC chronic food insecurity analysis conducted in October 2015*, about 70% the population is chronically food insecure, among them, 43% is facing moderate and severe chronic food insecurity (IPC level 3 or 4).  All analysed areas were classified into moderate chronic food insecurity (IPC Level 3) or severe chronic food insecurity (IPC Level 4), in particular: Northwest, Northeast, Central, Southeast, North (Ranquite, Pignon, LaVictoire, Dondon, St Raphael, Bahon) and Artibonite (Anse-Rouge,Terre Neuve, Gonaives, Gros Morne, St Marc, La Chapelle, Verettes, La Chapelle).  The population classification is described as below:  About 15% of the population of the analysed areas are in severe chronic food insecurity (IPC Level 4). The affected households suffer from lack [...]

Oct 2015/ Oct 2020



More analyses

Acute Malnutrition Classification

While the overall nutrition situation has improved according to the Integrated Phase Classification (IPC) for Acute Malnutrition conducted in February 2018, the levels of acute malnutrition remain at Critical levels (Phase 4; GAM WHZ 15.0 - 29.9 percent) in Turkana Central, North, West and South, Tana River, Wajir North, North Horr and Laisamis sub-counties. In addition, Isiolo and Kajiado reported a Serious nutrition situation (Phase 3; GAM WHZ 10.0 -14.9 percent). Narok county was classified as Alert (Phase 2; GAM WHZ ≥ 5 to 9.9 percent) while Kilifi, Kwale, Kitui, Makueni, Mbeere and Tharaka were Acceptable (Phase 1; GAM WHZ <5%). The nutrition situation is projected to remain in the same phase in Turkana and Wajir North while a deterioration is expected in Isiolo, North H[...]

Jan 2018/ Apr 2018

Acute Malnutrition Classification

DISCLAIMER: please note that this IPC Acute Malnutrition analysis was conducted together with an IPC Acute Food Insecurity analysis. To view the related IPC Acute Food Insecurity analysis, please click here.  The January 2018 nutrition situation reflects typical post-harvest seasonal improvements, with expectedly lower GAM rates that are attributed to humanitarian assistance, food stocks from harvests, improved access to nutrition and health services, reduction in morbidity and disease outbreaks during the dry season. Of the 22 SMART surveys conducted between September 2017 and January 2018, eight of them showed GAM rates above the 15% WHO emergency threshold. However, five counties in Jonglei (Ayod, Pibor, Akobo, Nyirol and Twic East), all counties in Northern Bahr el Ghazal (except A[...]

Jan 2018/ Jul 2018

Acute Malnutrition Classification

Based on the IPC Acute Malnutrition (IPC AMN) scale, 9 of the 18 provinces in Burundi are classified as in Phase 2 while the other provinces are categorised as being in Phase 1. According to the IPC AMN scale, Phase 2 indicates ‘Alert’ situation, which requires strengthening of existing response capacity and resilience and addressing of contributing factors to malnutrition as well as monitoring of the situation. Of the nine provinces classified as being in “Alert” situation with regards to acute malnutrition, 3 provinces (namely Karusi, Kayanza, and Kirundo) have relatively high levels of acute malnutrition which require particular attention. It's worth to recall that at least 3 cases of Noma have been registered this year in Kirundo province. Approximately about 125,000 children[...]

Oct 2017/ May 2018

Acute Malnutrition Classification

DISCLAIMER:This Acute Malnutrition analysis was integrated with an IPC Acute Food Insecurity analysis covering the same period. To view the related IPC Acute Food Insecurity analysis, click here.  Acute malnutrition has worsened compared to the same period in 2016 and remains high in many parts of South Sudan. Renk, Upper Nile, Twic, Warrap  and the Greater Baggari area in Wau former counties have Extreme Critical levels of acute malnutrition while 31 counties in Lakes, NBeG, Unity, parts of Jonglei, WBeG and Eastern Equatoria, show Critical levels of acute malnutrition. The main contributing factors are the high levels food insecurity; widespread fighting, displacement; poor access to services; high morbidity; extremely poor diets; poor hygiene and sanitation. Levels of acute mal[...]

Sep 2017/ Dec 2017

Acute Malnutrition Classification

DISCLAIMER: please note that the IPC Acute Malnutrition maps displayed above were included in an IPC Acute Food Insecurity analysis referring to the same period. There are no specific Key Results for Acute Malnutrition for this analysis, to view the Key Results for Acute Food Insecurity, please click here or download the full brief. [...]

May 2017/ Jul 2017



More analyses

Chronic Food Insecurity Classification

The first IPC Chronic Food Insecurity analysis conducted in Honduras has allowed to estimate that 9 of the 10 departments of the Dry Corridor of the country are in Level 3 (Moderate Chronic Food Insecurity); and a department (Francisco Morazán) in Level 2 (Mild Chronic Food Insecurity). IPC Chronic Food Insecurity Analyses results are valid up to 5 years, in absence of unusual shocks. 23% of the analyzed households are in Levels 3 (17%) or 4 (6%). For these households, food consumption presents a deficit of dietary energy for at least 2 months a year and every day they do not consume a proper diet. These households are characterized by low purchasing power, which is aggravated by the constant increase of food prices, reflecting this condition in an access to an inadequate diet in term[...]

Apr 2018/ Apr 2023

Acute Food Insecurity Classification

In April 2018, 5.5 million people, 13% of the analyzed population, were estimated to be in Crisis and Emergency (IPC Phases 3 and 4) in Sudan and in need of urgent action. The estimate corresponds to an increase of 45% compared to the previous analysis occurred at the same period last year (2017).   In the projected period, from May to July 2018, people in Crisis (IPC Phase 3) and Emergency (IPC Phase 4) are expected to increase to up to 6 million which corresponds to 14% of the total population analyzed.   Darfur, where at least 2.1 million people are still displaced, accounts for about half of the population in Crisis and Emergency (IPC Phase 3 and 4). In North Darfur almost 1 million people are in IPC Phase 3 and 4. Two localities are in Emergency (IPC Phase 4), namely Tawi[...]

Apr 2018/ Jul 2018

Acute Food Insecurity Classification

In March 2018, seven concentrations in CAR were classified in Emergency (IPC Phase 4) and ten prefectures and two concentrations were classified in Crisis (IPC Phase 3). During the lean season, from April to August 2018, in the absence of food assistance, it is estimated that there will be five prefectures and eight concentrations in Emergency (IPC Phase 4) and eight prefectures and one concentration Crisis (IPC Phase 3). Only the Bangui area would maintain IPC Phase 2 (Stress). Even with current food assistance, the population in need of immediate assistance in March 2018 was around 1.6 million and during the lean period (April - August 2018) would be around 2 million, of which a third located in sub-prefectures with a high concentration of displaced persons. The most vulnerab[...]

Mar 2018/ Aug 2018

Acute Food Insecurity Classification

KEY RESULTS FOR MARCH-JUNE 2018 The current period of the analysis coincides in part with the end of the lean season and the beginning of the crop season. Overall, we note a decrease in the number of people requiring urgent action in the areas most affected by the long drought of 2016, intensified by the effects of El Niño. However, with most districts classified as IPC Phase 3 (Crisis) or IPC Phase 3! (Crisis - would probably be at least 1 higher phase without the effects of Humanitarian Aid),the food and nutritional situation in the analysis zones remains worrying. Indeed, around 1 million people, or 30% of the population in the areas analyzed, are still in IPC Phase 3 and 4 (Crisis and Emergency), and require urgent action to reduce their food and nutrition deficits and protect [...]

Mar 2018/ Sep 2018

Acute Food Insecurity Classification

Between March and mid-April, the harvest and post-harvest period, the Kinyinya commune of the Ruyigi province was classified in the Crisis (IPC Phase 3). The rest of the country was classified in either Stress (IPC Phase 2) or Minimum (IPC Phase 1). During the next lean season from mid-April to May 2018, the proportion of populations in Crisis phase could increase by 3% compared to the current phase. Thus, the number of people in Crisis (IPC Phase 3) would rise from 1,460,000 people (13% of the total population) between March and mid-April 2018 to 1,780,000 people (15%) from mid-April to May 2018. Very good agricultural performances were recorded for the 2018A season, which benefited from a favorable rainfall regime, especially in the Northern, Eastern and Imbo Plains Depressions,[...]

Mar 2018/ May 2018



More analyses

Join our mailing list  

  >