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Acute food
insecurity


Chronic food
insecurity


Acute
malnutrition



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COUNTRY / REGION
TYPE OF ANALYSIS
KEY RESULTS
VALIDITY PERIOD

Acute Food Insecurity Classification

How Severe, How Many and When – In August 2019, an estimated 6.35 million people (54% of the population) are classified in Crisis (IPC Phase 3) or worse acute food insecurity, among whom an estimated 1.7 million people are facing Emergency (IPC Phase 4) acute food insecurity and 10,000 people are in Catastrophe (IPC phase 5). Compared to the same period in 2018, there is a slight reduction in the proportion of people facing Crisis (IPC Phase 3) or worse acute food insecurity by an estimated 5%. However, high levels of acute food insecurity still persist in the country. In both periods, these estimates are in the presence of humanitarian food assistance. In the projection period of September to December 2019, the food security situation is expected to improve as seasonal harvests become a[...]

Sep 2019/ Sep 2019

Acute Food Insecurity Classification

Up to 2.1 million people across Somalia are expected to face food consumption gaps, high acute malnutrition, or depletion of assets indicative of Crisis (IPC Phase 3) or worse outcomes through December 2019. Moreover, an estimated one million children under the age of five are likely to be acutely malnourished through mid-2020.[...]

Jul 2019/ Dec 2019

Acute Food Insecurity Classification

In DRC, the IPC analysis was conducted simultaneously in 5 different pools from 1 to 13 June 2019, followed by a national consolidation workshop in Goma from 8 to 11 July 2019. The analysis covered 109 territories for the current period of analysis (July to December 2019) and 84 for the projected period (January – May 2020) out of a national total of 145. The IPC results show that: Between July and December 2019, 15.6 millions of people will face severe acute food insecurity (IPC phase 3 and more) including 11.7 millions of people in Crisis (Phase 3) and more than 3.9 million in Emergency (IPC Phase 4). For the projected period (January – May 2020), 13.3 million are expected to be in severe acute food insecurity with more than 3.5 million in Emergency (Phase 4). The population most[...]

Jul 2019/ May 2020

Acute Food Insecurity Classification

Currently, 25% of the rural population are estimated to be in Crisis or Emergency (IPC Phase 3 and 4) and face moderate to large food consumption gaps  or are only marginally able to meet minimum food needs by depleting essential assets or employing crisis or emergency coping strategies. Another 26% are in Stress (IPC Phase 2).   Between October and December, the number of people in IPC Phase 3+ is expected to increase to 3.58 million (38%) with nine districts classified in Emergency (IPC Phase 4).  The first half of the agricultural season (Oct-Dec 2018) was affected by El Niño, which resulted in a delayed start of the season; and the second half was characterised by prolonged dry spells. The Eastern and parts of Southern Zimbabwe were affected by Cyclone Idai. These climate shock[...]

Jun 2019/ Dec 2019

Acute Food Insecurity Classification

How Severe, How Many, and When: In the current period – July to September 2019 – around 0.67 million people are estimated to be in IPC Phase 3 (Crisis) and require urgent humanitarian assistance. 2.9 million people are estimated to be in IPC Phase 2 (Stress) and require livelihood support. In the projected period, which covers the lean season from October 2019 to March 2020, 1.06 million people are estimated to be in IPC Phase 3, and 3,58 million people are estimated to be in IPC Phase 2.   The districts that are classified under Phase 3 which are likely to require urgent action are concentrated in the southern districts. Three districts are in Phase 3. Where and Who: The most affected districts are in the southern region, in total 15 in number, and the worst off are located within [...]

Jul 2019/ Mar 2020



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Chronic Food Insecurity Classification

280,000 people (about a third of the total population) are in a chronic food insecurity situation requiring urgent intervention aimed, in particular, at improving food consumption, preventing malnutrition, promoting programs of safety nets and the elimination or reduction of the factors underlying this food insecurity. The most severely affected areas are the Obock regions in the north, the Ali Sabieh and Dikhil regions in the south, with respectively 30%, 25% and 20% of the rural population at IPC Level 4 (Severe). In the capital and its periphery (Balbala), 15% and 25% respectively are at Level 3, about 113,000 people. This analysis was done using data covering the period 2007 to 2017, however, the results will be valid for 5 years, from 2018 to 2022. Rural populations, particularly in [...]

Jan 2018/ Dec 2022

Chronic Food Insecurity Classification

The analysis conducted in April 2018 shows that approximately 430 000 people of the population analysed (36 percent) are chronically food insecure across 12 municipalities and the special Administrative Region of Oecussi and Ambeno (SAROA); out of them, 176 000 people (15 percent) are experiencing severe chronic food insecurity (IPC level 4), and 254 000 people (21 percent) are moderately chronically food insecure (IPC level 3). Additionally, 461 000 people (39 percent) are mildly food insecure (IPC level 2). Only 25 percent of the population analysed is considered food secure (IPC level 1).  Of major concern are the municipalities of Ermera, Manufahi and the Special Administrative Region of Oé-Cusse Ambeno (SAROA), which fall under severe chronic food insecurity (IPC level 4). Other mu[...]

Apr 2018/ Apr 2023

Chronic Food Insecurity Classification

KEY RESULTS The results of the first IPC Chronic Food Insecurity Analysis in Guatemala identified the following levels of Chronic Food Insecurity (CFI): five of the 22 departments are in IPC Phase 4; 13 departments in IPC Phase 3; and four departments in IPC Phase 2. Of the total population analysed that is equivalent to 17.3 million, 16% (2.7 million) are in IPC Phase 4 (Severe); 22% (3.8 million) are in IPC Phase 3 (Moderate), and 38% (6.6 million) are in IPC Phase 2 (Mild). The remaining 24% of the population (4.2 million) are in IPC Phase 1 (Minimal). Six and a half million people do not have adequate energy in their diet: 2.7 million for four or more months a year (Severe CFI), and 3.8 million, between two and four months a year (Moderate FCI). The population that inhabits these ho[...]

Aug 2018/ Aug 2023

Chronic Food Insecurity Classification

The first IPC Chronic Food Insecurity analysis conducted in Honduras has allowed to estimate that 9 of the 10 departments of the Dry Corridor of the country are in Level 3 (Moderate Chronic Food Insecurity); and a department (Francisco Morazán) in Level 2 (Mild Chronic Food Insecurity). IPC Chronic Food Insecurity Analyses results are valid up to 5 years, in absence of unusual shocks. 23% of the analyzed households are in Levels 3 (17%) or 4 (6%). For these households, food consumption presents a deficit of dietary energy for at least 2 months a year and every day they do not consume a proper diet. These households are characterized by low purchasing power, which is aggravated by the constant increase of food prices, reflecting this condition in an access to an inadequate diet in term[...]

Apr 2018/ Apr 2023

Chronic Food Insecurity Classification

In the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), two cleavages are visible: (i) the Eastern block, which is is strongly affected by armed conflicts of foreign troops and local militia, and (ii) the western and central blocks, more stable but very landlocked, developing rates of chronic malnutrition above the acceptable threshold. The national analysis of the Integrated Framework for the Classification of Chronic Food Security shows three major zones: (i) the city province of Kinshasa at Level 2 (light food insecurity), (ii) the center of the country and the Northeast at Level 4 (severe chronic food insecurity), and (iii) the remaining areas without Kinshasa at Level 3 (food insecurity).  According to national surveys conducted over the last ten years, three out of five households have acce[...]

Mar 2016/ Mar 2021



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Acute Malnutrition Classification

DISCLAIMER: please note that this IPC Acute Malnutrition analysis was integrated with an IPC Acute Food Insecurity analysis referring to the same period. Please click here. The overall situation of acute malnutrition has slightly improved this year as compared to the same period last year with no county reporting extreme critical levels (GAM above 30%) of acute of malnutrition in 2018. A total of 31 counties in the former states of Warrap, Unity, Upper Nile, and Jonglei reported ‘Critical’ (GAM (WHZ) 15.0 – 29.9%) levels of acute malnutrition while 20 counties in Lakes, Jonglei, Unity and Upper Nile reported ‘Serious’ (GAM (WHZ) 10.0-14.9%) levels of acute malnutrition. Most of the counties for which county-level data was available in Central Equatoria and Western Equatoria reco[...]

Sep 2018/ Dec 2018

Acute Malnutrition Classification

DISCLAIMER: please note that this IPC Acute Malnutrition analysis was integrated with an IPC Acute Food Insecurity analysis referring to the same period. Please click here. The prevalence of acute malnutrition is distributed as follows:  Critical: Turkana, Samburu, Mandera, East Pokot, North Horr Serious: West Pokot, Tana River, Garissa, Wajir Alert: Moyale, Saku, Baringo North/Marigat Acceptable: Narok, Kajiado, Makueni, Taita Taveta, Kwale, Kilifi.  The overall nutrition situation is projected to remain stable in most areas. However, past trends suggest the potential for fast deterioration in highly vulnerable counties such as Turkana and Mandera as households here have not yet fully recovered. In addition, poor child care practices, high morbidity, low literacy, poverty, and limite[...]

Aug 2018/ Nov 2018

Acute Malnutrition Classification

DISCLAIMER: please note that this IPC Acute Malnutrition analysis was conducted together with an IPC Acute Food Insecurity analysis. To view the related IPC Acute Food Insecurity analysis, please click here. Results from 30 separate nutrition surveys conducted by FSNAU and partners between in June and July 2018 indicate that the overall nutrition situation in Somalia has continued to improve due to a combination of improved food security conditions, reduced outbreak of diseases and sustained humanitarian interventions. However, high level of acute malnutrition tends to persist in several population groups due to underlying/structural causes. However, high level of acute malnutrition tends to persist in several population groups due to underlying/structural causes. The overall, level of a[...]

Aug 2018/ Dec 2018

Acute Malnutrition Classification

DISCLAIMER: please note that this IPC Acute Malnutrition analysis was integrated with an IPC Acute Food Insecurity analysis referring to almost the same period (April - September 2018). Please click here for more information. Período de Março-Maio 2018:  Neste período, que corresponde a época de pré-colheita, o número de casos de desnutrição aguda estimados é de cerca de 34,000 crianças destas, cerca de 6,000 com desnutrição aguda grave e 29,000 com desnutrição aguda moderada. O distrito de Namuno na província de Cabo Delgado foi o único em situação de alerta (fase 2 do IPC-DA por Peso para Altura) e os restantes 8 distritos  classificados em situação aceitável. Refira-se que para igual período do ano passado (2017) o distrito de Namuno havia sido classificado em [...]

Jun 2018/ Feb 2019

Acute Malnutrition Classification

While the overall nutrition situation has improved according to the Integrated Phase Classification (IPC) for Acute Malnutrition conducted in February 2018, the levels of acute malnutrition remain at Critical levels (Phase 4; GAM WHZ 15.0 - 29.9 percent) in Turkana Central, North, West and South, Tana River, Wajir North, North Horr and Laisamis sub-counties. In addition, Isiolo and Kajiado reported a Serious nutrition situation (Phase 3; GAM WHZ 10.0 -14.9 percent). Narok county was classified as Alert (Phase 2; GAM WHZ ≥ 5 to 9.9 percent) while Kilifi, Kwale, Kitui, Makueni, Mbeere and Tharaka were Acceptable (Phase 1; GAM WHZ <5%). The nutrition situation is projected to remain in the same phase in Turkana and Wajir North while a deterioration is expected in Isiolo, North H[...]

Jan 2018/ Apr 2018



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Acute Food Insecurity Classification

How Severe, How Many and When – In August 2019, an estimated 6.35 million people (54% of the population) are classified in Crisis (IPC Phase 3) or worse acute food insecurity, among whom an estimated 1.7 million people are facing Emergency (IPC Phase 4) acute food insecurity and 10,000 people are in Catastrophe (IPC phase 5). Compared to the same period in 2018, there is a slight reduction in the proportion of people facing Crisis (IPC Phase 3) or worse acute food insecurity by an estimated 5%. However, high levels of acute food insecurity still persist in the country. In both periods, these estimates are in the presence of humanitarian food assistance. In the projection period of September to December 2019, the food security situation is expected to improve as seasonal harvests become a[...]

Sep 2019/ Sep 2019

Acute Food Insecurity Classification

Up to 2.1 million people across Somalia are expected to face food consumption gaps, high acute malnutrition, or depletion of assets indicative of Crisis (IPC Phase 3) or worse outcomes through December 2019. Moreover, an estimated one million children under the age of five are likely to be acutely malnourished through mid-2020.[...]

Jul 2019/ Dec 2019

Acute Food Insecurity Classification

In DRC, the IPC analysis was conducted simultaneously in 5 different pools from 1 to 13 June 2019, followed by a national consolidation workshop in Goma from 8 to 11 July 2019. The analysis covered 109 territories for the current period of analysis (July to December 2019) and 84 for the projected period (January – May 2020) out of a national total of 145. The IPC results show that: Between July and December 2019, 15.6 millions of people will face severe acute food insecurity (IPC phase 3 and more) including 11.7 millions of people in Crisis (Phase 3) and more than 3.9 million in Emergency (IPC Phase 4). For the projected period (January – May 2020), 13.3 million are expected to be in severe acute food insecurity with more than 3.5 million in Emergency (Phase 4). The population most[...]

Jul 2019/ May 2020

Acute Food Insecurity Classification

Currently, 25% of the rural population are estimated to be in Crisis or Emergency (IPC Phase 3 and 4) and face moderate to large food consumption gaps  or are only marginally able to meet minimum food needs by depleting essential assets or employing crisis or emergency coping strategies. Another 26% are in Stress (IPC Phase 2).   Between October and December, the number of people in IPC Phase 3+ is expected to increase to 3.58 million (38%) with nine districts classified in Emergency (IPC Phase 4).  The first half of the agricultural season (Oct-Dec 2018) was affected by El Niño, which resulted in a delayed start of the season; and the second half was characterised by prolonged dry spells. The Eastern and parts of Southern Zimbabwe were affected by Cyclone Idai. These climate shock[...]

Jun 2019/ Dec 2019

Acute Food Insecurity Classification

How Severe, How Many, and When: In the current period – July to September 2019 – around 0.67 million people are estimated to be in IPC Phase 3 (Crisis) and require urgent humanitarian assistance. 2.9 million people are estimated to be in IPC Phase 2 (Stress) and require livelihood support. In the projected period, which covers the lean season from October 2019 to March 2020, 1.06 million people are estimated to be in IPC Phase 3, and 3,58 million people are estimated to be in IPC Phase 2.   The districts that are classified under Phase 3 which are likely to require urgent action are concentrated in the southern districts. Three districts are in Phase 3. Where and Who: The most affected districts are in the southern region, in total 15 in number, and the worst off are located within [...]

Jul 2019/ Mar 2020



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