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Acute food
insecurity


Chronic food
insecurity


Acute
malnutrition



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COUNTRY / REGION
TYPE OF ANALYSIS
KEY RESULTS
VALIDITY PERIOD

Acute Food Insecurity Classification

Food security in Yemen has deteriorated further since the last IPC analysis conducted in June 2016. An estimated 17 million people, which is equivalent to 60% of the total Yemeni population, are food insecure and require urgent humanitarian assistance to save lives and protect livelihoods. Among those, approximately 10.2 million people are in IPC Phase 3 ‘crisis’ and 6.8 million people are in IPC Phase 4 ‘emergency’. Nationally, the population under Emergency (IPC Phase 4) and Crisis (IPC Phase 3) has increased by 20% compared to the results of the June 2016 IPC analysis. Acute malnutrition is a major outcome of the severe food insecurity and is at alarming levels. Malnutrition has been a serious problem in Yemen for a long time, especially chronic malnutrition (stunting). However[...]

Mar 2017/ Jul 2017

Acute Food Insecurity Classification

About 51% of the population is suffering from food insecurity and malnutrition, in line with Crisis (IPC Phase 3) or Emergency (IPC Phase 4). The population under Emergency (IPC Phase 4) and Crisis (IPC Phase 3) has increased by 9.4% compared to the results of the June 2015 IPC analysis. Moreover, the conflict displaced more than 2.75 million since March 2015. Of concern is the Around Taiz governorate where 1,028,610 people (33% of the population) are under Emergency (IPC Phase 4) and 832,667 people (27% of the population) are under Crisis (IPC Phase 3). The food security and nutrition situation is under constant deterioration in many parts of Taiz due to the ongoing active conflict, restrictions, disruption of markets, scarcity and high price of food and absence of basic health, water and[...]

Jun 2016/ Sep 2016

Acute Food Insecurity Classification

NOTICE: Area Classification endorsed by the IPC Global Support Unit (GSU) as Indicative IPC Acute Phase Classification*. Population table represents the best estimate done by the Yemen IPC TWG and it is not endorsed as an IPC Outcome due to lack of sufficient and up to date outcome evidence. The ten (10) Governorates, Aden, AlDhale’e, Lahj, Taiz, Abyan, Sa’ada, Hajjah, Hodeida, Al Bayda, Shabwa are classified in Emergency food insecurity (IPC Phase 4). These governorates are currently among the worst affected by the conflict. Nine governorates are classified as facing a food security “Crisis” or IPC Phase 3: Amran, Dhamar, Sana’a, Sana’a, city, Ibb, Mareb, Rayma, Al Mahweet, Al Jawf. It is estimated that currently at least six million people are identified as being in [...]

Jun 2015/ Aug 2015

Acute Food Insecurity Classification

As of 2014, about 4.8 million people (18.3% of the population of Yemen) are under Emergency, 5.8 million people under Crisis. 334,037 people are internally displaced and 215,381 are returnees. During the May-July 2014 period, the fuel shortage crisis and price rise contributed to an increase in food prices, further reducing food access to the poorest households who rely heavily on the market. Agriculture employs more than 54% of the work force although 85-90% of Yemenis depend on commercial food imports. Agricultural production was constrained by poor/late rainfall combined with high input prices and fuel crisis. This also reduced employment opportunities and household incomes. In addition, very poor health facilities, limited water and environmental sanitations are the common features fo[...]

Sep 2014/ Feb 2015

Acute Food Insecurity Classification

Although there has been a slight improvement comparing with the last IPC analysis in April 2013, food insecurity is still high due to inadequate physical and financial access to food with chronic or protracted conditions of extreme poverty, stable but high food prices and limited sources of income, high vulnerability and low coping capacity of households, and a context of political instability, internal conflicts and insufficient public services and infrastructures. Acute malnutrition is high due also to poor food utilization, water and sanitation and health issues. This situation is likely to persist or intensify next year as Yemeni workers return from Saudi Arabia (leading to loss of remittances), purchasing power is reduced, and inflation is rising. Crop production levels are also expe[...]

Dec 2013/ Feb 2014



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Acute Food Insecurity Classification

Food security in Yemen has deteriorated further since the last IPC analysis conducted in June 2016. An estimated 17 million people, which is equivalent to 60% of the total Yemeni population, are food insecure and require urgent humanitarian assistance to save lives and protect livelihoods. Among those, approximately 10.2 million people are in IPC Phase 3 ‘crisis’ and 6.8 million people are in IPC Phase 4 ‘emergency’. Nationally, the population under Emergency (IPC Phase 4) and Crisis (IPC Phase 3) has increased by 20% compared to the results of the June 2016 IPC analysis. Acute malnutrition is a major outcome of the severe food insecurity and is at alarming levels. Malnutrition has been a serious problem in Yemen for a long time, especially chronic malnutrition (stunting). However[...]

Mar 2017/ Jul 2017

Acute Food Insecurity Classification

About 51% of the population is suffering from food insecurity and malnutrition, in line with Crisis (IPC Phase 3) or Emergency (IPC Phase 4). The population under Emergency (IPC Phase 4) and Crisis (IPC Phase 3) has increased by 9.4% compared to the results of the June 2015 IPC analysis. Moreover, the conflict displaced more than 2.75 million since March 2015. Of concern is the Around Taiz governorate where 1,028,610 people (33% of the population) are under Emergency (IPC Phase 4) and 832,667 people (27% of the population) are under Crisis (IPC Phase 3). The food security and nutrition situation is under constant deterioration in many parts of Taiz due to the ongoing active conflict, restrictions, disruption of markets, scarcity and high price of food and absence of basic health, water and[...]

Jun 2016/ Sep 2016

Acute Food Insecurity Classification

NOTICE: Area Classification endorsed by the IPC Global Support Unit (GSU) as Indicative IPC Acute Phase Classification*. Population table represents the best estimate done by the Yemen IPC TWG and it is not endorsed as an IPC Outcome due to lack of sufficient and up to date outcome evidence. The ten (10) Governorates, Aden, AlDhale’e, Lahj, Taiz, Abyan, Sa’ada, Hajjah, Hodeida, Al Bayda, Shabwa are classified in Emergency food insecurity (IPC Phase 4). These governorates are currently among the worst affected by the conflict. Nine governorates are classified as facing a food security “Crisis” or IPC Phase 3: Amran, Dhamar, Sana’a, Sana’a, city, Ibb, Mareb, Rayma, Al Mahweet, Al Jawf. It is estimated that currently at least six million people are identified as being in [...]

Jun 2015/ Aug 2015

Acute Food Insecurity Classification

As of 2014, about 4.8 million people (18.3% of the population of Yemen) are under Emergency, 5.8 million people under Crisis. 334,037 people are internally displaced and 215,381 are returnees. During the May-July 2014 period, the fuel shortage crisis and price rise contributed to an increase in food prices, further reducing food access to the poorest households who rely heavily on the market. Agriculture employs more than 54% of the work force although 85-90% of Yemenis depend on commercial food imports. Agricultural production was constrained by poor/late rainfall combined with high input prices and fuel crisis. This also reduced employment opportunities and household incomes. In addition, very poor health facilities, limited water and environmental sanitations are the common features fo[...]

Sep 2014/ Feb 2015

Acute Food Insecurity Classification

Although there has been a slight improvement comparing with the last IPC analysis in April 2013, food insecurity is still high due to inadequate physical and financial access to food with chronic or protracted conditions of extreme poverty, stable but high food prices and limited sources of income, high vulnerability and low coping capacity of households, and a context of political instability, internal conflicts and insufficient public services and infrastructures. Acute malnutrition is high due also to poor food utilization, water and sanitation and health issues. This situation is likely to persist or intensify next year as Yemeni workers return from Saudi Arabia (leading to loss of remittances), purchasing power is reduced, and inflation is rising. Crop production levels are also expe[...]

Dec 2013/ Feb 2014



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