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Acute food
insecurity


Chronic food
insecurity


Acute
malnutrition



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COUNTRY / REGION
TYPE OF ANALYSIS
KEY RESULTS
VALIDITY PERIOD

Acute Food Insecurity Classification

Based on the September IPC analysis, it is expected that 6.1 million1 people (59% of the total population) faced Crisis (IPC Phase 3) or worse acute food insecurity at the peak of the lean season (July – August), of whom 47,000 were in Catastrophe (IPC phase 5) and 1.7 million were in Emergency (IPC Phase 4). Food security has improved slightly with the green harvest in September relative to July and August, and further improvements are expected in the post-harvest period between October and December 2018 when the number of people in Crisis (IPC Phase 3) or worse is most likely to reduce to 4.4 million (43% of the total population), with 26,000 in Catastrophe (IPC Phase 5). However, an anticipated earlier than normal start of the lean season will result in an estimated 5.2 million (4[...]

Sep 2018/ Mar 2019

Acute Food Insecurity Classification

In January 2018, 5.3 million people (48% of the population) are estimated to be facing Crisis and Emergency (IPC Phases 3 and 4) acute food insecurity, out of which 1 million people are facing Emergency (IPC Phase 4) acute food insecurity. Compared with the same time last year, this reflects a 40% increase in the population facing severe food insecurity in the post-harvest season. Worsening food insecurity is primarily driven by protracted conflict and displacements, which have contributed to insufficient crop production (only 61% of the 2018 national cereal needs are met by the harvest), disruptions to livelihoods and persistent macroeconomic deterioration. Livelihoods have been further eroded by climatic shocks, such as prolonged dry spells and flooding, and pest infestations (e[...]

Jan 2018/ Jul 2018

Acute Food Insecurity Classification

In September 2017, 6 million people were in Crisis (IPC Phase 3), Emergency (IPC Phase 4) and Catastrophe (IPC Phase 5), which corresponded to 56% of the total population. From October to December 2017, the number of people in need of humanitarian assistance (IPC phase 3 and above) is expected to drop to 4.8 million (45% of the total population. However, this figure includes a doubled number of people classified in Emergency (IPC Phase 4) compared to the same time last year, and 25,000 people still experiencing catastrophic conditions and extreme food gaps.  By January-March 2018, it is estimated that 5.1 million (48% of the total population) people will continue to face acute food insecurity, with 20,000 people in Humanitarian Catastrophe (IPC Phase 5). Persistent insecurity and ar[...]

Sep 2017/ Mar 2018

Acute Food Insecurity Classification

Food security in South Sudan has further deteriorated due to armed conflict, economic crisis, and below-average harvests that were exhausted well before the ongoing lean season. An estimated 6.0 million (50% of the population) people are expected to be severely food insecure in June-July 2017, compared to 5.5 million (45% of the population) people in May 2017; Famine is no longer occurring in Leer and Mayendit counties, and further deterioration was prevented in Koch and Panyijiar counties of former Southern Unity State as a result of immediate and sustained multi-sector humanitarian assistance delivered to the affected population since March 2017.  Even though no county has been classified under famine (Phase 5) in this IPC update, the situation continues to be very critical. In June-J[...]

May 2017/ Jul 2017

Acute Food Insecurity Classification

According to the IPC Analysis update conducted by the South Sudan IPC Technical Working Group (TWG) and endorsed by the government:  The food security situation in South Sudan continues to deteriorate, with 4.9 million (about 42% of population) estimated to be severely food insecure (IPC Phases 3, 4, and 5), from February to April 2017. This is projected to increase to 5.5 million people, (47% of the national population) at the height of the 2017 lean season in July. The magnitude of these food insecure populations is unprecedented across all periods.  In Greater Unity, some counties are classified in Famine or high likelihood/risk of Famine. In the absence of full quantitative data sets (food consumption, livelihoods changes, nutrition and mortality), analyses were complemented with p[...]

Jan 2017/ Jul 2017



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Acute Malnutrition Classification

DISCLAIMER: please note that this IPC Acute Malnutrition analysis was integrated with an IPC Acute Food Insecurity analysis referring to the same period. Please click here. The overall situation of acute malnutrition has slightly improved this year as compared to the same period last year with no county reporting extreme critical levels (GAM above 30%) of acute of malnutrition in 2018. A total of 31 counties in the former states of Warrap, Unity, Upper Nile, and Jonglei reported ‘Critical’ (GAM (WHZ) 15.0 – 29.9%) levels of acute malnutrition while 20 counties in Lakes, Jonglei, Unity and Upper Nile reported ‘Serious’ (GAM (WHZ) 10.0-14.9%) levels of acute malnutrition. Most of the counties for which county-level data was available in Central Equatoria and Western Equatoria reco[...]

Sep 2018/ Dec 2018

Acute Malnutrition Classification

DISCLAIMER: please note that this IPC Acute Malnutrition analysis was conducted together with an IPC Acute Food Insecurity analysis. To view the related IPC Acute Food Insecurity analysis, please click here.  The January 2018 nutrition situation reflects typical post-harvest seasonal improvements, with expectedly lower GAM rates that are attributed to humanitarian assistance, food stocks from harvests, improved access to nutrition and health services, reduction in morbidity and disease outbreaks during the dry season. Of the 22 SMART surveys conducted between September 2017 and January 2018, eight of them showed GAM rates above the 15% WHO emergency threshold. However, five counties in Jonglei (Ayod, Pibor, Akobo, Nyirol and Twic East), all counties in Northern Bahr el Ghazal (except A[...]

Jan 2018/ Jul 2018

Acute Malnutrition Classification

DISCLAIMER:This Acute Malnutrition analysis was integrated with an IPC Acute Food Insecurity analysis covering the same period. To view the related IPC Acute Food Insecurity analysis, click here.  Acute malnutrition has worsened compared to the same period in 2016 and remains high in many parts of South Sudan. Renk, Upper Nile, Twic, Warrap  and the Greater Baggari area in Wau former counties have Extreme Critical levels of acute malnutrition while 31 counties in Lakes, NBeG, Unity, parts of Jonglei, WBeG and Eastern Equatoria, show Critical levels of acute malnutrition. The main contributing factors are the high levels food insecurity; widespread fighting, displacement; poor access to services; high morbidity; extremely poor diets; poor hygiene and sanitation. Levels of acute mal[...]

Sep 2017/ Dec 2017

Acute Malnutrition Classification

DISCLAIMER: please note that the IPC Acute Malnutrition maps displayed above were included in an IPC Acute Food Insecurity analysis referring to the same period. There are no specific Key Results for Acute Malnutrition for this analysis, to view the Key Results for Acute Food Insecurity, please click here or download the full brief. [...]

May 2017/ Jul 2017

Acute Malnutrition Classification

Acute malnutrition remains a major public health emergency in South Sudan. Out of 23 counties with recent data, 14 have Global Acute Malnutrition (GAM) at or above 15%. GAM of above 30% is observed in Leer and Panyijiar while Mayendit had GAM levels of 27.3%. Similarly, a worsening nutrition situation atypical to the post-harvest season is observed in the Greater Equatoria region – particularly in Greater Central Equatoria – a deterioration associated with widespread insecurity, lack of physical access, disruption of the 2016 agricultural season and the ongoing economic crisis. Areas in the Greater Bahr el Ghazal show higher than usual levels of acute malnutrition expected for the post-harvest season, indicating a worsening situation. Insecurity, displacement, poor access to services,[...]

Sep 2016/ Jul 2017



More analyses

Acute Food Insecurity Classification

Based on the September IPC analysis, it is expected that 6.1 million1 people (59% of the total population) faced Crisis (IPC Phase 3) or worse acute food insecurity at the peak of the lean season (July – August), of whom 47,000 were in Catastrophe (IPC phase 5) and 1.7 million were in Emergency (IPC Phase 4). Food security has improved slightly with the green harvest in September relative to July and August, and further improvements are expected in the post-harvest period between October and December 2018 when the number of people in Crisis (IPC Phase 3) or worse is most likely to reduce to 4.4 million (43% of the total population), with 26,000 in Catastrophe (IPC Phase 5). However, an anticipated earlier than normal start of the lean season will result in an estimated 5.2 million (4[...]

Sep 2018/ Mar 2019

Acute Malnutrition Classification

DISCLAIMER: please note that this IPC Acute Malnutrition analysis was integrated with an IPC Acute Food Insecurity analysis referring to the same period. Please click here. The overall situation of acute malnutrition has slightly improved this year as compared to the same period last year with no county reporting extreme critical levels (GAM above 30%) of acute of malnutrition in 2018. A total of 31 counties in the former states of Warrap, Unity, Upper Nile, and Jonglei reported ‘Critical’ (GAM (WHZ) 15.0 – 29.9%) levels of acute malnutrition while 20 counties in Lakes, Jonglei, Unity and Upper Nile reported ‘Serious’ (GAM (WHZ) 10.0-14.9%) levels of acute malnutrition. Most of the counties for which county-level data was available in Central Equatoria and Western Equatoria reco[...]

Sep 2018/ Dec 2018

Acute Food Insecurity Classification

In January 2018, 5.3 million people (48% of the population) are estimated to be facing Crisis and Emergency (IPC Phases 3 and 4) acute food insecurity, out of which 1 million people are facing Emergency (IPC Phase 4) acute food insecurity. Compared with the same time last year, this reflects a 40% increase in the population facing severe food insecurity in the post-harvest season. Worsening food insecurity is primarily driven by protracted conflict and displacements, which have contributed to insufficient crop production (only 61% of the 2018 national cereal needs are met by the harvest), disruptions to livelihoods and persistent macroeconomic deterioration. Livelihoods have been further eroded by climatic shocks, such as prolonged dry spells and flooding, and pest infestations (e[...]

Jan 2018/ Jul 2018

Acute Malnutrition Classification

DISCLAIMER: please note that this IPC Acute Malnutrition analysis was conducted together with an IPC Acute Food Insecurity analysis. To view the related IPC Acute Food Insecurity analysis, please click here.  The January 2018 nutrition situation reflects typical post-harvest seasonal improvements, with expectedly lower GAM rates that are attributed to humanitarian assistance, food stocks from harvests, improved access to nutrition and health services, reduction in morbidity and disease outbreaks during the dry season. Of the 22 SMART surveys conducted between September 2017 and January 2018, eight of them showed GAM rates above the 15% WHO emergency threshold. However, five counties in Jonglei (Ayod, Pibor, Akobo, Nyirol and Twic East), all counties in Northern Bahr el Ghazal (except A[...]

Jan 2018/ Jul 2018

Acute Food Insecurity Classification

In September 2017, 6 million people were in Crisis (IPC Phase 3), Emergency (IPC Phase 4) and Catastrophe (IPC Phase 5), which corresponded to 56% of the total population. From October to December 2017, the number of people in need of humanitarian assistance (IPC phase 3 and above) is expected to drop to 4.8 million (45% of the total population. However, this figure includes a doubled number of people classified in Emergency (IPC Phase 4) compared to the same time last year, and 25,000 people still experiencing catastrophic conditions and extreme food gaps.  By January-March 2018, it is estimated that 5.1 million (48% of the total population) people will continue to face acute food insecurity, with 20,000 people in Humanitarian Catastrophe (IPC Phase 5). Persistent insecurity and ar[...]

Sep 2017/ Mar 2018



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