Uganda: Acute Food Insecurity and Acute Malnutrition Situation February 2021 - January 2022
Acute Food Insecurity and Acute Malnutrition analysis of Karamoja and Acute Malnutrition analysis of refugee settlements
VALIDITY PERIOD
01.02.2021 > 31.01.2022

Key
results


Recommendations
& next steps


Acute
Malnutrition


Overview

Karamoja, located in the northeast, is one of the poorest regions in Uganda, with income poverty at 61% and food poverty at 70% (UNHS, 2016/17). The population is mainly rural, with livelihoods based on livestock and crop production, and of recent, a growing range of diversified livelihood activities. The region continues to have the highest food insecurity and malnutrition levels in Uganda due to factors related to inadequate food, poor dietary diversity, structural poverty, limited livelihood options, poor hygiene and sanitation, and disease, with a recent overall improvement in safe water source access but low water use. The region also faces a predisposition to recurrent climate-related shocks such as extended mid-season dry spells/drought, erratic rainfall that often causes floods/waterlogging, and the COVID-19 pandemic.

Karamoja Acute Food Insecurity (AFI)

About 30% of the analyzed population in the six districts of Karamoja (361,000 people) are experiencing high levels of food insecurity (IPC Phase 3 or above) between March and July 2021. In terms of magnitude, the districts with the highest number of people in IPC Phase 3 or above are Kotido (94,900), Kaabong (51,500), Napak (56,300) and Moroto (42,400). In terms of severity, the districts with the highest percentage in IPC Phase 3 or above are Kotido (45%), Kaabong ( drivers of acute food insecurity include insecurity, the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and high food prices. During the projection period (August 2021 – January 2022), the food security situation in the Karamoja region is expected to improve. Of the nine districts in the region, three districts are anticipated to be in IPC Phase 3 (Crisis), and six districts are anticipated to be in IPC Phase 2 (Stressed) during the projection period.

Karamoja Acute Malnutrition (AMN)

During the lean season of 2021, February – July 2021, of the nine districts in the Karamoja region, one district has Critical levels of acute malnutrition (IPC AMN Phase 4), four districts have Serious levels of acute malnutrition (IPC AMN Phase 3), and four districts have Alert levels of acute malnutrition (IPC AMN Phase 2). About 56,600 children in these nine districts are affected by acute malnutrition and need treatment. Approximately 46,300 children are moderately malnourished, while over 10,200 children are severely malnourished. Around 10,200 pregnant or lactating women are also acutely malnourished. Kaabong district has Critical levels of acute malnutrition with a Global Acute Malnutrition (GAM) prevalence of 18.6%. Amudat, Kotido, Moroto and Napak districts have Serious levels of acute malnutrition, with GAM prevalences of 10.9%, 10.4%, 14.2% and 9.4%, respectively. The districts with Alert levels of acute malnutrition are Abim (GAMN 6.3%), Karenga (GAM 9.6%), Nabilatuk (GAM 8%) and Nakapiripirit (GAM 8.2%). Karenga has high levels of acute malnutrition, with a slight chance of slipping into IPC AMN Phase 3 during the projection period (August 2021 - January 2022).

Refugees Acute malnutrition (AMN)

Of the 14 refugee settlements included in this analysis, six settlements had Alert levels of acute malnutrition (IPC Phase 2) and eight settlements had Acceptable levels of acute malnutrition (IPC Phase 1), according to the Integrated Food Security Phase Classification (IPC) Acute Malnutrition analysis during the low acute malnutrition season of 2020/2021, November 2020 – April 2021. It is anticipated that three settlements will have Serious levels of acute malnutrition (IPC Phase 3), five settlements will have Alert levels of acute malnutrition (IPC Phase 2), and six settlements will have Acceptable levels of acute malnutrition (IPC Phase 1) during the high acute malnutrition season of 2021, May – September 2021. About 24,581 children in the 14 settlements included in the analysis are likely affected by acute malnutrition and in need of treatment. 18,940 children are likely experiencing moderate acute malnutrition while 5,641 children are likely experiencing severe acute malnutrition. Additionally, 2,961 pregnant or lactating women are likely affected by acute malnutrition, also in need of treatment.


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